M1 – The Accidentals


Translatable Verbal Script:

The accidentals.
Accidental symbols.
A pitch outside of a key signature or mode is referred to as an accidental, and is either a natural, flat or a sharp.

They raise or lower the pitch by a half step from the indicated note, and are played that way only through the measure unless another accidental indicates to change the pitch again.
We have a sharp, flat, a natural symbol, a double sharp, and a double flat.

This is a sharp symbol. A sharp raises the pitch a half step up, or one key immediately to the right on the piano. For example, G natural to G sharp.
Flat. A flat lowers the pitch a half step down, or one key immediately to the left on the piano. For example, G natural to G flat.

The natural symbol has two functions and can raise or lower a pitch a half step. If a note is intended to be a sharp because of a key signature or a previous sharp accidental, then the natural symbol lowers the note a half step to its natural key.
If a note is intended to be a flat because of a key signature or a previous flat accidental, then the natural symbol raises the note a half step to its natural key.

Here’s a natural key symbol. When on a sharp key, a natural lowers the pitch a half step down, or one key immediately to the left on the piano. For example F sharp to F natural.
Here’s a natural for a flat key. When on a flat key, a natural raises the pitch a half step up, or one key immediately to the right on the piano. For example, E flat to E natural.

The double sharp and the double flat.
The double sharp raises the pitch one full step, or a full step to the right on the piano. For example, D natural to E natural.
The double flat lowers the pitch one full step, or a full step to the left on the piano.
For example, E natural to D natural.

Here we see how a G is played as a G sharp, and how an A is played as an A flat. Notice that the G sharp and A flat are the same key, which all depends on the key signature that you’re in.

Here we see how a G is played as a G double sharp, and how a B is played as a B double flat. Again, the same key is played on the piano and it is only different because of the designated key signature.

If we are in the key signature of G-major, all F in all octaves are played in sharp, or a half step up. Adding a natural symbol to an F lowers the note a half step to its natural F for that measure.
If we are in the key signature of B-flat major, all B and E notes are played in flat or a half step down. Adding a natural symbol to an E or a B note, no matter what octave, will raise the note a half step up to its natural E and B key for that measure.

Here are all the key signatures that we’ll discuss in future modules.
C major, F major, B flat major, A flat major, D flat major, G flat major, C flat major, C major, G major, D major, A major, E major, B major, F sharp major, C sharp major.

Closing:
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